Vitamin K2 (Menaquinone-7) supplementation does not affect vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors activity in healthy individuals (Ren R et al.)

A paper published recently in the Medicine (Baltimore) journal discusses the outcome of an intervention study that aimed to investigate whether vitamin K2 supplementation at recommended doses affects the activity of vitamin K dependent coagulation factors in healthy individuals without any anticoagulation treatment.

For the purpose of this study the researchers enrolled forty healthy volunteers between 25 and 40 years of age. Vitamin K2 in the form of menaquinone-7 (MK-7) was administrated at 90 μg for 30 days. Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), and blood coagulation factors II, VII, IX, and X activities and Protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) were measured on days 0 and 30 after MK-7 administration.

The results of this study revealed that MK-7 supplementation at recommended dosage (90 mcg) does not alter hemostatic balance in healthy populations without anticoagulation treatment. According to the researchers, the reasonable explanation for the steady coagulation profile after taking vitamin K2 is that all Gla-containing coagulation factors are fully carboxylated at recommended dietary allowance levels, and excess vitamin K intake might not induce overactivation. The authors indicated that carboxylation of prothrombin could not increase with MK-7 administration in healthy individuals.

“Their study might provide evidence in eliminating the concerns of hemostatic balance for MK-7 supplementation in healthy individuals to prevent bone and vascular diseases,” says Dr. Katarzyna Maresz, president of the International Science and Health Foundation. “Thus, taking extra vitamin K2 is safe from a coagulation point of view,” she adds.

 

References:

Ren R, Liu J, Cheng G, Tan J. Vitamin K2 (Menaquinone-7) supplementation does not affect vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors activity in healthy individuals. Medicine (Baltimore). 2021 Jun 11;100(23):e26221. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000026221.

 

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